Stay command Archives

Labrador Lulu and the Stay command


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Labrador Lulu and the Stay command

The first time I met* Lulu and her new owner in October they had come to refresh obedience training.

lulu1 300x216 Labrador Lulu and the Stay command

Lulu & Mom

Yesterday I met Lulu again. Her mum told me that Lulu is a wonderful dog and they get together very well

*Lulu is Now Is an eight year old Yellow Labrador. She is very friendly, with a non stop wagging tail and happy smile.

Lulu was adopted (from home where she was no loner wanted) by very lovely lady who lost her husband a couple months ago…

The only things that bothers mum is that Lulu gets very exited when the door bell ring and visitors come into the house.

Mum doesn’t know what to do …

After Mum left me with Lulu, I started practicing the Sit-Stay and Down-Stay commands from a distance. Lulu had already been through obedience training with me before. At first she tried to break commands but by the end of the day she was doing everything very well.

lulu2 300x167 Labrador Lulu and the Stay command

Labrador Lulu learning the Down stay command

Mom will practice it with Lulu at home and ask her neighbors to help her by becoming her “visitors”

When the door bell rings, Lulu’s mum will make Lulu down- stay before going to open the door. When people will come in they will ignore Lulu but after while Mum will release Lulu.

Next Time Lulu will learn the Place command and Stay -Place.

After she has learnt these, when door the bell rings Mum will then just send Lulu to her Place to stay until the time is right for Mum to release her.

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Hand signals are very important tools you can use to train your dog.

Dogs aren’t verbal creatures – even though they can learn how respond to your words. For them it’s easy to see movement – so they can readily perceive the movement involved in a hand signal. Give the hand signal immediately followed by the verbal command.

The Stay Signal is one of the commands you can easily learn and teach your dog.

 Obedience Dog Training   Hand Signals – The Stay Signal

Hand signal - Stay command 1

Hand signal – Stay command 1 – Dog on your side

If your dog is beside or behind you, drop your arm and hand to your side, fingers down, with the palm of your hand directly in front of the dog’s nose.

 Obedience Dog Training   Hand Signals – The Stay Signal

Hand signal - Stay command 2

Hand signal – Stay command 2 – Dog(s) in front of you.

If you are facing your dog, point your fingers upward with your palm at an angle that’s easy for your dog to see.

When you teach hand signals to a dog try to keep them large and precise.

Poodle Shih Tzu mix Grace


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Grace is a 14 week old Poodle Shih Tzu mix

 Poodle Shih Tzu mix Grace

Grace

Grace is a very cute young puppy. On her first day she was a little bit unsure in her new environment – a new place, new people, and different dogs. Now, after a few visits she is doing very well.

 Poodle Shih Tzu mix Grace

Grace with friends

Grace is playing with other dogs, and has learnt the sit-stay, down-stay and come commands.

 Poodle Shih Tzu mix Grace

Grace learning the Down command

We are now practicing walking on a leash with Grace.

Follow the following steps to teach your dog to walk on a leash:

  1. Begin by using a happy voice to say “lets go” or some other phrase you like.
  2. Start walking. Pat your leg and show a treat to encourage puppy to follow you.
  3. If your puppy starts to wander away and tightens the leash, say “easy”.  Then turn and walk in a direction away from the puppy. Don’t jerk on the leash. That will happen automatically if the puppy doesn’t pay attention. Don’t slow down and wait for the puppy.  It’s the puppy’s responsibility to keep that leash slack.